About your Search

20121226
20130103
SHOW
Book TV 27
Today 19
Cavuto 9
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 84
FBC 77
SFGTV 77
MSNBCW 58
WBAL (NBC) 52
CNNW 49
CSPAN 48
CSPAN2 40
CNBC 34
WRC (NBC) 26
KQED (PBS) 23
WHUT (Howard University Television) 22
KTVU (FOX) 20
KPIX (CBS) 15
WTTG 15
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 850
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 850 (some duplicates have been removed)
is review of the renewable energy task force. >> we will have fried. >> i'm going to turn it over to danielle and give a presentation of the report and we are available for questions after that. >> great. thank you. >> thanks jason. i will return through this fairly quickly, especially the background which you are all familiar with, but if you questions please stop me. awz know san francisco has a long history of climate action and a lot of the work that we have done over the last couple years is guided by our climate change ordinances and our plan to be updated and the sf puc plan and the city set forth aggressive greenhouse gas reduction targets. san francisco emissions come from a variety of sources, but electricity is about 25% of that, so it's one of the largest areas for reduction in the city. san francisco's electricity supply is actually quite clean to the national average. we are 41% renewable if you include hydro electric power and hetch hetchy and pg&e hydro generation, but the goal as set out by mayor newsom is to become 100% renewable and we have a task force comp
. but billions in subidies for wind energy should be expiring. could they be right or will they blow up energy prices. we'll go in focus with steve bor bes and bill and morgan. is it paying off? >> no, it is 18 times that of nuclear energy. ronald reagan was right. thest thing to immortality is a government program. politicians are labeled with hot wind and we label the section gone with the wind. >> we have sending sib sidies in '92, has it been worth it. >> we are early inlet process. we have subsidized oil and coal and gas. we have done them from darn near a century. these don't look so bad. like it or not, the majority of americans believe that global warming is an issue. we need to develop clear energy sources. fossil fuels may be a difficult problem. we are subsidizing thingings. it is cheaper to produce energy from natural gas. it is a subsidies. other than it is natural gas there. it is 63 cents compared to $53. that is not a pay off to me. >> i will have to disagree with rick. last time wind energy had any impact was in the century. we have moved in oil and natural gas. but let's get
energy. the former government said it would aim to take all reactors off line within a couple of decades but now a new government is in power and promising a different approach. >> reporter: prime minister abe is putting everything on the table when it comes to japan's energy policy. he and others in the committee have said they will explore possibilities including restarting nuclear reactors. >> translator: we need to decide our energy policy based on technical assessments. we will not start with the conclusion of halting nuclear power generation by the 2030s. >> reporter: the previous administration led by former prime minister yoshihko noda drafted an energy policy that stated the government would aim to shut down all nuclear plants by the 2030s. before last year's accident in fukushima, nuclear power accounted for 26% of the total energy supply in japan. currently only two out of 50 reactors in the country are online adding a mere 3% to the supply. fossil fuels are taking up the slack. utilities are paying more to import lng or liquefied natural gas to fire thermal plants. many are p
to question the use of atomic energy. the former government said it would aim to take all reactors off line within a couple of decades but now a new government is in power and promising a different approach. >> reporter: prime minister abe is putting everything on the table when it comes to japan's energy policy. he and others in the committee have said they will explore possibilities including restarting nuclear reactors. >> translator: we need to decide our energy policy based on technical assessments. we will not start with the conclusion of halting nuclear power generation by the 2030s. >> reporter: the previous administration led by former prime minister yoshihko noda drafted an energy policy that stated the government would aim to shut down all nuclear plants by the 2030s. before last year's accident in fukushima, nuclear power accounted for 26% of the total energy supply in japan. currently only two out of 50 reactors in the country are online adding a mere 3% to the supply. fossil fuels are taking up the slack. utilities are paying more to import lng or liquefied natural gas to fire
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
energy drilling policies to get at the national resources and of course, the big story that you mentioned, paul, is what's happening with right to work, it wasn't just michigan, sometimes we forget earlier indiana became a right to work state, too, so, two midwestern states that have traditionally been pretty heavily unionized moved to right to work and i wouldn't be surprised if next year we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting contrast in maryland and virginia, neighboring states. you have in virginia, a republican governor cutting taxes, cutting spending. in maryland, you have a liberal democratic governor who's raised tacks all kinds of taxes, income taxes, gas taxes sales taxes, you name it. as a result virginia has a job growth rate that is three times that of maryland. virginia has a lower unemployment rate. so you see that contrast and paul, i think in this election, it actually worked to the president's benefit in some of the swing states like o-ohio and virginia and you had the voters in the states experiencing above average growth thanks to the policies of republican g
on refills advaircopd.com. ♪ . adam: welcome back to "money". the energy information administration recently made a prediction that grabbed headlines around the world. the united states it said will become the world's top oil producer by the end of this decade, 2020 but the eia is taking serious heat for that bold call. the association for the study of peak oil and gas says the eia must revise its prediction, claiming it creates a misleading picture of u.s. energy supplies. did the eia complete completely overshoot or will it prove spot on? we have a editor of the 7s report. thanks for showing up. the eia said the united states is on track to do this but where are they getting it wrong? are they confusing u.s. energy overall with just oil or are they making some other flaw in their logic? >> hi, adam. that is exactly right. so it is feasible by the end of this decade that the united states could be the world's largest energy producer but not the world's largest oil producer and you can see that just through the numbers. saudi arabia produces about 10 million barrels per day. we produce about
and environmental friendliness. most data centers, by design, consume vast amounts of energy in an incongruously wasteful manner, interviews and documents show. >> that is right. we also point out that different plays in this industry behave differently. there is a range. we're talking about the typical data center. doing these digital tasks, everything from banks to big department stores -- the computers in these data centers typically are actually not doing anything but trying electricity, for the most part. most of the electricity -- the vast majority -- is powering a computer that is waiting for something to do. these things, once turned on -- we as consumers insist that this infrastructure always be available, and never run out of capacity. those computers are sitting there, just waiting for us to call upon them to do something. whether it is day or night, the dead of night when no one is asking for the service, or the middle of the day when everyone is, they're always on. it is a built-in way of operating in this industry. it has developed a lot of critics. >> you also write about their en
're going to reach these goals of 100% renewable energy in that time frame. >> right. >> and certainly that's why i had some concerns around making sure that the values of the cleanpower sf program are ones that are always emphasized because again this is a conversation that has been in this country really since -- for a long time, but certainly in the 70's it took on a greater level of discussion, but then the conversation sort of didn't go anywhere. i think it was jimmy carter was the person person to put solar energy panels on the roof, and then i mentioned a couple of times someone named emory lovins who wrote a book "soft energy path" and took on the issues of fossil fuels and coal and sustainable wind and solar and other sources and just 30 years later we're still -- >> still plugging away. >> still at the beginning of the conversation, so for years i guess san franciscans really haven't had an opt in -- certainly not an opt out choice, and so sometimes we talk too much about opt in i get a little nervous, so anyway i thed to thank you. >> you're welcome. >> before going to public co
on 2016. when way come backna from -- when we6. come back from energy to c education, it is picked for the good news stories of the year. >>> well, just when you thought there wasn't all that much to cheer about in 2012, a panel is here with some good news. "wall street journal" editorial board member starts us off. what is your big good news of the year? >> it is a high energy story. >> just like you, high energy. >> basically we have through technology, the united states has discovered it has a huge amount of both shell oil and shell gas, and it can get it out of the ground. as i say thanks to technology. and that's not just a u.s. story. it is a north american story. there was a ton of oil in canada. there is the same geological formations in mexico. there is a lot of energy that can come upe'. the ceo of flor says there is at least $30 billion of potential c projects around the u.s. gulf of mexico. >> u people say by 2020 we could be self-sufficient in terms of providing most of the oil and the gas we get domestically. what are the implications of this for the larger economy?
will include west virginia in the conversation about energy. do have you any idea they would even be considered because of this? would it embarrass the obama administration into including west virginia? >> my guess or my observation about the administration, they are pretty shameless. i doubt we could embarrass them into were of anything. jackson has put through rule after rule, the damage that the economy with almost no environmental benefit. they are raising energy prices, and putting people out of work. and they are doing it, without any support in continental for this -- in congress for this, that is why they deliberated in second rate. and do everything behind people's backs, and not let the public know who they are talking. to i expect we'll find, when we see the 12,000 e-mails, we'll see a lot of private chatter with environmental pressure groups. and i think you know, it could be embarrassing. tom: myron thank you for joining us. congress -- republican congressman ben harper is joining me about that e-mail situation, congressman, do have you plans for lisa jackson to come before your c
on this pig. >> look closer at the energy sector. it was the worse performer with energy stocks ending lower for the sixth straight session. the move lower comes despite a rise in more than 2% on crude oil this week. david? david: as was just said, it's not all red. there is some green on this markets, and it's focusing on retailers. barnes & noble, macy's, zales. people buying diamond rings and bracelets. >> oh, i wouldn't know, david. i'm not a realist, apparently. david: only one woman on my diamond list, but go ahead. >> a look overseas at japan, last trading day of the year, shares closing, get this, at the highest level since last year's tsunami for the year gaining 23%, the biggest percentage rise since 2005. ending on a nice positive note over there. david: wish it was good here. congressional leaders meeting with the president, what's hanging on the edge of the cliff is higher taxes on dividends. coming up, the chairman and ceo of southern company owning a bunch of power companies in the south tells us why the tax hike would be a huge blow to his industry, a blow everybody will feel
mccord and el cerrito and the chair of the sierra club bay chapter energy subcommittee, and the bottom line is that the plan is not yet ready for approval. for one thing the staff needs to fill in the details about just how you're going to reach out to the various communities in the city. supervisor olague that touched on that. and second the plan does not take into account the impacts of the roll out and pricing scenarios being developed by local power which you have contracted with to do this, and the rate fairness board wants to study these before recommending the rates which will affect what you tell people in your surveys and outreach. so we respectively ask that you direct the staff to return to you in december or january with a really detailed outreach program that clarifies the outreach strategy and integrates local build out and jobs, and infrastructure and incomes into pricing and outreach. thank you. >> hi folks. nice to see you all again. i think it's been a number of months since i addressed you briefly. of course i speak on behalf of the advocates and we have been
energy. 4 million in tax credits for two and three real electric vehicles something tells me this is not an effort to get act of card in every garaged. maybe a segue. is anyone uses anymore? seriously, the money is for plug-in motorbikes. credits were extended for energy-efficient appliances. by a diesel and renewable diesel. there is a $59 million credit for algae growers. tax credits to encourage the production of cellulose biofuel. you know what, it's good when they came plexor industry. then there is tax-exempt financing for what is called the new york liberty zone, the area around the world trade center. goldman, ceo white blank fein says thank you very much for the special benefits. i guess that makes up for the smaller bonus pool. the list goes on and on, and there is a railroad operators, 2,202,000,000. unbelievable. here we are flirting with greek style public finances, and congress continues to line the pockets of their friends and family. i don't know about you, but there is some old acquaintances i would like to forget. coming up, more fiscal fallout from the fisc
there is no mention of clean power and how we have no currently and relying completely i will say hard energy sources and fossil fuels and that sort of thing, and even in my own personal campaign there was a hit piece that came out about how i was in bed with shell oil and nigeria and active vifts there and we know that is true and disappearing and what not and i don't think we should under estimate the type of political quagmire that this program will find itself in and the attacks are unwarranted and misinforming and certainly i'm not suggesting they're all coming from pg&e, but certainly there is a motivation to maintain the monopoly they have held in the city around providing energy, so with that being said i just wanted to close my comments and i am glad next week i think we're at lafco hearing the task force recommendations. that is critical and sometimes we pass the policies and our actions never conform with the policies that we pass, so if we're serious about reaching that goal in 10 years i think we really need to get serious and that's why cleanpower sf is so important, but in closing i wa
are gathered here in the heart of our city, beneath a symbol of energy and life and hope for the world. you have decorated it with peace cranes and light. wishes and dreams, and most importantly your energy. and now, on behalf of the sisters of perpetual indulgence inc, we gather this energy and strength that we may send it to the nuns above and to give it to any and all that needs its strength. to release the energy of hope that this magnificent tree represents i will ask each and every one of you if you please every time you hear me say we say... you will evoke the words of harvey milk by saying as one group you got to give them hope. now please raise your hands towards the tree of hope and we say you got to give them hope. for all lgbtq young people struggling with bullies and intolerance, we say that you got to give them hope for all transgendered people fighting to live with dignity and respect. we say you got to give them hope. for all of those who seek to protect the rights of lgbtq people across the world, we say you got to give them hope. for our sick and elderly in need of a will
. >> a yellow door. >> you mentioned appliances and energy efficiency. how much do green improvements, solar systems and new appliances, affect the market these days in value? is everybody looking for green? >> i am really trying to push that more. i am sure jameses, as well. -- james is, as well. we use what is available us, as far as being retailers and trying to influence people. there is a walk ability score that shows your property, how green it is by being close to services and close two stores, schools, and the walk ability -- walkability. they're doing that across the country and it is coming up in marketing. when green comes in, we are pushing for green designations and the work people do to make their house green. >> my own direct experience, generally, the buying public will not pay more if it is green. maybe that is something people don't want to hear. it is the honest truth. that is my own direct experience. i think it is absolutely -- what will happen with the current green movement in building, is that it will become standard. it is becoming the standard. ultimately, it will b
those changes for $3,000, $4,000, $5,000. they're oftentimes more energy- efficient. the general consensus is people like that. one other thing that i think is overlooked in terms of value, and i don't know of the survey talks about it, is landscaping and plants. lance camping, plants, and trees are really inexpensive compared to major remodels. i often feel it is something that is heavily overlooked. it as a lot of value. it is a touchy-really, emotional part of a property. oftentimes, we don't have front yards. maybe there should be a tree out front. maybe you should have potted plants lining the stairs going up. perhaps the rearguard in, although you never use it, doesn't matter if you don't get sunshine. plant flowers that do not need son. those are oftentimes good ways to spend money on adding value to your home. >> people that are selling their homes do need to have someone that will absolutely come in. i had a stager come in my house. you need to have another i that will absolutely have you get rid of the little things that you think make it look homey and people love it,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 850 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)